An Innovative Solution Based on Human-Computer Interaction to Support Cognitive Rehabilitation

  • José M. Cogollor Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
  • Matteo Pastorino Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
  • Javier Rojo Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
  • Alessio Fioravanti Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
  • Alan Wing School of Psychology, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
  • Maria Teresa Arredondo Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
  • Manuel Ferre Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
  • Jose Breñosa Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
  • Joachim Hermsdörfer Institute of Movement Science, Department of Sport and Health Science, Technical University of Munich, 80992 Munich, Germany
  • Javier De Teresa RGB Medical Devices S.A., Alfonso Gómez 42, 28037 Madrid, Spain
  • Clare Walton 6Stroke Association House, 240 City Road, London EC1V 2PR, UK
  • Andrew Worthington Headwise, Innovation Centre, Longbridge Technology Park, Birmingham B31 2TS, UK
  • Christos Giachritsis BMT Group Ltd, Goodrich House 1, Waldegrave Road Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 8LZ, UK
Keywords: Activities of Daily Living, CogWatch, stroke, cognitive rehabilitation, healthcare

Abstract

This contribution focuses its objective in describing the design and implementation of an innovative system to provide cognitive rehabilitation. People who will take advantage of this platform suffer from a post-stroke disease called Apraxia and Action Disorganisation Syndrome (AADS). The platform has been integrated at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and tries to reduce the stay in hospital or rehabilitation center by supporting self-rehabilitation at home. So, the system acts as an intelligent machine which guides patients while executing Activities of Daily Living (ADL), such as preparing a simple tea, by informing them about the errors committed and possible actions to correct them. A short introduction to other works related to stroke, patients to work with, how the system works and how it is implemented are provided in the document. Finally, some relevant information from experiment made with healthy people for technical validation is also shown.

Author Biographies

José M. Cogollor, Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Technical Aeronautical Engineer and M.Sc. Automation and Robotics at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAR (UPM-CSIC). With good knowledge about ECSS standards related to the Spatial Product Quality, he has work experience as project engineer on the development of a programming environment to simulate the guidance system of an aerial vehicle and military aircrafts maintenance. Currently, he is a member of Robots and Intelligent Machines researching group, focused on Automation, Teleoperation and Bilateral Control. Representative member of the students/researchers in the centre. PhD Student on design and evaluation of multimodal interfaces for cognitive rehabilitation.
Matteo Pastorino, Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
B.Sc. Telecommunication Engineering and M.Sc. Information and Communication Technology candidate, by the Politécnico of Torino. He has collaborated in several R&D projects dealing with information and communication technologies (ICT) in the areas of e-Inclusion and e-Health. He has participated as an expert in developing algorithms of patterns recognition to detect motor disorders and design of models in patients with Parkinson Disease in PERFORM (FP7) project. 
Javier Rojo, Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
5-year-degree Industrial Engineer on Automation and Electronics and 3-year-degree Industrial Engineer on Electronics at Universidad Pontificia de Comillas. Currently, he works as a researcher/PhD student in Robots and Intelligent Machines researching group, at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAR (UPM-CSIC), focused on Automation, Teleoperation and Bilateral Control. His research interests are focused on electronics apply to human body, bioelectronics and healthcare.
Alessio Fioravanti, Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
M.Sc. Computer Science Engineering. He received the MPhil degree at the Technical University of Madrid in 2010. He is enrolled, since 2007, in the management and technical development of Scientific & Technical Projects dealing with e-Health research. He is expert in information platforms and technologies for monitoring chronic disease patients through intelligent biomedical wear, wireless technologies and mobiles platforms. He has collaborated in several R&D co-funded projects such as ICT-2007-1-216270-METABO (FP7), devoted to the study and support of metabolic management in diabetes for both, patients and specialists, as responsible of patient’s empowerment platform.
Alan Wing, School of Psychology, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
He has a background in physics and psychology. He currently holds the Chair of Human Movement in the School of Psychology where he is Director of Research. He is a Chartered Psychologist, member of the Experimental Psychology Society, and Chair of the Eurohaptics Society. He has considerable experience in multi-disciplinary projects, working on sensory and motor psychophysical testing in normal and neuropsychological human subject groups across the lifespan, first at the Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge (as Assistant Director) and subsequently at the University of Birmingham. He is currently Technical chair of FP7 Nanobiotouch (€3.4M) and also holds UK grants on  motor timing, dynamic balance in the elderly, gait after stroke. He has published over 150 papers on the psychology of human movement.
Maria Teresa Arredondo, Life Supporting Technologies, ETSIT-UPM, Avda. Complutense 30, Madrid, Spain
She is full Professor of Bioengineering at the Telecommunication Engineering Faculty - UPM. Presently, she is the Director of the Vodafone Chair and the Director of International Latin-America Affairs of UPM. Prof. Arredondo has been Principal Researcher of more than 50 Granted S&T Projects and EU-funded Projects dealing with Ambient Intelligence applied to the social and healthcare sector environments. Especially, in the areas of: advanced and smart graphical user interfaces and human factors evaluation; systems and services for people with special needs; mobile access to information services; tele-psychiatry, homecare; and intelligent biomedical clothes. Currently, she is leading the UPM participation in some of the most challenging projects funded by the EU in the seventh framework programme in the area of e-Health (HeartCycle, METABO, and PERFORM). She is the author of 10 books and more than 300 scientific papers. She will act as the responsible for the UPM- LifeSTech works in this proposal.
Manuel Ferre, Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
He has been professor at UPM since 1997. He received his Ph.D. degree in Robotics in 1997 (with honors). As postdoc, he visited Human-Machine System Laboratory at MIT in 1997. He is author of more than 100 of technical publications about telerobotics and human-robot interfaces, and is editor of the ‘Springer Series on Touch and Haptic Systems’. His research is focused on robotics, human interfaces for telerobotics and control architectures in teleoperated systems. He is actively participating in international societies such as IEEE-RAS and EuroHaptics. He is responsible of several national and international projects on robotics and remote control (EFDA GOT-RH and ITN Marie Curie PureSafe). He acts as coordinator for the UPM contribution to CogWacth and responsible for the UPM-ROMIN tasks. 
Jose Breñosa, Centre for Automation and Robotics CAR (UPM-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain
He is 5-year-degree Industrial Engineer and M.Sc. Automation and Robotics at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAR (UPM-CSIC). Actually, he is focused on Automation, Teleoperation and Bilateral Control systems in a PhD on Teleoperation Robotics, working as a researcher/PhD student in Robots and Intelligent Machines researching group, at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, CAR (UPM-CSIC). His research interests are focused on teleoperation, force-feedback devices and electronics applied to human body.
Joachim Hermsdörfer, Institute of Movement Science, Department of Sport and Health Science, Technical University of Munich, 80992 Munich, Germany
He holds the chair in Movement Science at the Department of Sport and Health Science at TUM. He is engineer by education and has been working in neuroscience of motor control since more than 20 years. Before his appointment at TUM he was the research leader of the research group “sensorimotor disturbances” at the Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group in the Hospital München-Bogenhausen. He is author of more than 90 peer reriew articles.and 20 book chapter or books. One of his main research topics is apraxia. Other interests include motor learning, object manipulation, motor neurorehabilitation, neural representation of motor control and models of motor control.
Clare Walton, 6Stroke Association House, 240 City Road, London EC1V 2PR, UK
She is the Research Communications Officer at The Stroke Association. She is responsible for identifying key findings from research funded by charity and working with the communications department to ensure these stories reach stroke patients and the public. Clare also works with the Stroke Alliance for Europe (SAFE) to disseminate research information from several EU funded projects via the Stroke Support Organisations in Europe.  Following an MSc in Biochemistry at the University of Oxford, she obtained her PhD in cellular neuroscience at the Rockefeller University in New York City investigating the ability of new neurons to functionally repair damage to the song system of adult songbirds
Andrew Worthington, Headwise, Innovation Centre, Longbridge Technology Park, Birmingham B31 2TS, UK
He is founding director of Headwise, and previously was lead clinician in a brain injury rehabilitation unit. He has a PhD in neuropsychology and is consultant in neuropsychology & rehabilitation, holds consultancy posts in several rehabilitation units across the UK, and is programmes director of MSc programmes in brain injury rehabilitation and brain injury case management at the University of Birmingham. He has an MSc in Health Economics, and has published widely on rehabilitation and outcome evaluation.
Christos Giachritsis, BMT Group Ltd, Goodrich House 1, Waldegrave Road Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 8LZ, UK
He is a research scientist with the BMT Group and a research associate (honorary) in the Sensory Motor Neuroscience group of the University of Birmingham (UOB and BMT are completely independent organisations with no financial and/or legal links). He has a PhD in Visual Psychophysics (Marie Curie Fellow), an MSc in Cognitive Science, a BSc in Mathematics and a BA in Sociology. He has extensive experience (over 7 years) in EU funded projects and is currently working in research and exploitation activities in the HaptiMap project which develops accessible mobile applications for map and location based services. He is also the technical manager of the GETAWAY project and responsible for the development of an automated decision system for identifying optimal evacuation routes at a London Underground station. Before joining BMT, he worked in the Touch-Hapsys and Immersence projects, during which he conducted research in haptic interfaces for virtual environments. Christos has published articles and book chapters on visual motion perception and haptic perception (e.g., weight, surface orientation, tactile navigation) in real and virtual environments and has co-edited a book on immersive multimodal interaction. He has also performed a consultancy role with the London Technology Network.

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Published
2014-10-20
How to Cite
Cogollor, J. M., Pastorino, M., Rojo, J., Fioravanti, A., Wing, A., Arredondo, M. T., Ferre, M., Breñosa, J., Hermsdörfer, J., De Teresa, J., Walton, C., Worthington, A., & Giachritsis, C. (2014). An Innovative Solution Based on Human-Computer Interaction to Support Cognitive Rehabilitation. Journal of Accessibility and Design for All, 4(3), 238-254. https://doi.org/10.17411/jacces.v4i3.52